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Research Papers

Numerical and Experimental Studies of Gas Pulsations in the Suction Manifold of a Multicylinder Automotive Compressor

[+] Author and Article Information
Jeong-Il Park

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Ray W. Herrick Laboratories, 140 S. Intramural Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2031skan99@hotmail.com

Nasir Bilal

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Ray W. Herrick Laboratories, 140 S. Intramural Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2031bilal@ecn.purdue.edu

Douglas E. Adams

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Ray W. Herrick Laboratories, 140 S. Intramural Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2031deadams@purdue.edu

Yoshinobu Ichikawa

 Sanden International Inc., 601 South Sanden Blvd., Wylie, TX 75098-4999ichikawa_yoshinobu@sanden.com

Jacob Bayyouk

 Sanden International Inc., 601 South Sanden Blvd., Wylie, TX 75098-4999bayyouk@sanden.com

J. Vib. Acoust 130(1), 011014 (Jan 23, 2008) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2732352 History: Received October 07, 2004; Revised February 06, 2007; Published January 23, 2008

This study predicts gas pulsations in the suction manifold of a multicylinder automotive air-conditioning compressor using a comprehensive simulation model of a reciprocating compressor. On the basis of the first law of thermodynamics and a simplified fourth-order Bernoulli-Euler linear differential beam equation for suction valves, the pressure in a cylinder and resultant pressure pulsation in the suction manifold are predicted. The mass flow rate through the valve is estimated assuming one-dimensional compressible flow through an orifice. All of the equations are then solved together in a sequence to obtain the pressure in the cylinder, valve response, and the mass flow rate. A complicated suction manifold geometry is modeled as a simplified cylindrical annular cavity to study gas pulsations in a multicylinder compressor, but the discharge process has not been considered in this study. Using the calculated mass flow rate, pressure pulsations in a simplified cylindrical annular cavity with an area change to consider “mode splitting” are predicted based on the characteristic cylinder method. It is shown that the simulation code can be a useful tool for predicting gas pulsations in the suction manifold of a multicylinder automotive compressor.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Configuration of a seven-cylinder compressor

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Figure 3

Schematic of the valve with piecewise linear springs

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Figure 4

Finite difference model

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Figure 5

Schematic of (a) a real annular cavity and (b) assumed simplified suction manifold

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Figure 6

Geometry of the suction line in the test bench

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Figure 7

Schematic of experimental test apparatus

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Figure 8

Pressure responses in the cylinder at 1500rpm with (a)50kg∕hr and (b)70kg∕hr and 2000rpm with (c)50kg∕hr and (d)70kg∕hr (- - - analysis, — experiment)

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Figure 9

Gas pulsations along the circumferential direction near the first set of natural frequencies at 1500rpm with (a)50kg∕hr and (b)70kg∕hr (-∘- 500Hz, -×- 550Hz; analysis, — 500Hz, - - - 550Hz; experiment) and 2000rpm with (c)50kg∕hr and (d)70kg∕hr (-∘- 433Hz, -×- 500Hz; analysis, — 433Hz, - - - 500Hz; experiment)

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Figure 10

Gas pulsations in the frequency domain at 1500rpm with (a)50kg∕hr and (b)70kg∕hr and 2000rpm with (c)50kg∕hr and (d)70kg∕hr (— analysis, - - - experiment)

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Figure 11

Maximum gas pulsations near the first set of natural frequencies at 1500rpm with 50kg∕hr when (a) the inlet location or (b) discharge pipe location is changed

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