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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

New Methods for Nonlinear Damping Identification of Damping Alloy

[+] Author and Article Information
Ziying Wu1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, P.O. Box 307, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province, 710048, Chinaziyingwu@tom.com

Hongzhao Liu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, P.O. Box 307, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province, 710048, Chinaliu-hongzhao@163.com

Lilan Liu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, P.O. Box 307, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province, 710048, Chinalilanliu@tom.com

Daning Yuan

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, P.O. Box 307, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province, 710048, Chinadaningyuan@tom.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 129(5), 678-684 (Feb 10, 2007) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2748460 History: Received September 26, 2005; Revised February 10, 2007

This paper presents two methods for the identification of nonlinear internal damping of alloy. One is the moving autoregressive model (MARM) method, and the other is the time-varying autoregressive model (TVARM) method. These procedures have been successfully implemented on two numerical examples. Comparison between simulation results demonstrates that the computation accuracy of the TVARM method is higher than that of the MARM method. In the experiments, the internal damping properties of the alloy Al-33Zn-6Si are researched, employing the rectangle beam with a nonuniform stress field and the trapezoid beam with a quasi-uniform stress field, respectively. Experimental results show that the internal damping of the alloy increases with the increasing strain and appears a nonlinear behavior. Moreover, the damping values of the trapezoid beam are relatively higher than those of the rectangle beam. Compared to the MARM method, the TVARM method can give a better description of nonlinear damping because the relation curve of loss factor versus strain obtained by the TVARM method is smoother than that obtained by the MARM method.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Damping , Alloys
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of the MARM method

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Figure 2

Relation curve of relative damping versus normalized amplitude, SNR=90dB

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Figure 3

Relation curve of relative damping versus normalized amplitude, SNR=50dB

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Figure 4

Relation curve of relative damping versus normalized amplitude, SNR=20dB

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Figure 5

Relation curve of relative damping versus normalized amplitude, SNR=90dB

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Figure 6

Relation curve of relative damping versus normalized amplitude, SNR=50dB

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Figure 7

Relation curve of relative damping versus normalized amplitude, SNR=20dB

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Figure 8

Schematic diagram of the nonlinear damping experimental system

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Figure 9

Rectangle cantilever beam specimen

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Figure 10

Trapezoid cantilever beam specimen

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Figure 11

Free response signal of the rectangle cantilever beam

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Figure 12

Free response signal of the trapezoid cantilever beam

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Figure 13

Relation curve of loss factor versus strain of the rectangle cantilever beam using the MARM method

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Figure 14

Relation curve of loss factor versus strain of the rectangle cantilever beam using the TVARM method

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Figure 15

Relation curve of loss factor versus strain of the trapezoid cantilever beam using the MARM method

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Figure 16

Relation curve of loss factor versus strain of the trapezoid cantilever beam using the TVARM method

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