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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Early Detection of Fatigue Damage on Rolling Element Bearings Using Adapted Wavelet

[+] Author and Article Information
Xavier Chiementin1

GMMS, Groupe de Mécanique, Matériaux et Structures, University of Reims, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2, Francexavier.chiementin@univ-reims.fr

Fabrice Bolaers, Jean-Paul Dron

GMMS, Groupe de Mécanique, Matériaux et Structures, University of Reims, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 129(4), 495-506 (Mar 19, 2007) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2748475 History: Received September 07, 2006; Revised March 19, 2007

Among the advanced techniques of the predictive maintenance, the vibratory analysis proves to be very effective, in particular, for monitoring rotating components such as the bearings. Their damage creates cyclic efforts which are at the origin of the processing of vibratory measurements. This processing can be made by temporal methods, frequential methods, or by time-scale methods using the wavelets for 2 decades. The wavelet transform is a very effective processing, however, the difficulties of application and interpretation of the results slow down their employment. The determination of the parameters of the wavelets makes its use all the more difficult. Moreover, the use of these time-scale methods is very expensive in time computation. This paper proposes a wavelet adapted to the mechanical shock response of a structure with n degrees of freedom. In addition, we developed a procedure for analysis of signals by this wavelet which makes it possible to accelerate the process and to improve detection in the case of disturbed signals. This methodology is compared with the traditional time-scale methods and is implemented to detect defects of different sizes on outer rings and inner rings of ball bearings.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Methods and alternatives for demodulation

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Figure 3

(a) Simulated shock responses; (b) computation of coefficients with wavelet; and (c) computation of coefficients with adapted wavelet

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Figure 4

(a) Experimental bench; (b) tool for spark erosion and bearings with defect; and (c) tool

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Figure 5

(a) Morlet wavelet; and (b) adapted wavelet

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Figure 6

Not very disturbed signals: (a) BPFO 20mm2; (b) BPFO 14mm2; (c) BPFO 8mm2; and (d) BPFI 20mm2

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Figure 7

cr computed for αϵ[200–50,000] for: (a) BPFO 20mm2; (b) BPFO 14mm2; (c) BPFO 8mm2; and (d) BPFI 20mm2

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Figure 8

Demodulation and detection of the frequency of the impulse train by wavelet demodulation for BPFO 20mm2: by MWDmax (a), (b), (c), by MWDthr (d), (e), (f), by AWD (g), (h), (i)

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Figure 9

Demodulation and detection of the frequency of the impulse train by wavelet demodulation for BPFO 14mm2: by MWDmax (a), (b), (c), by MWDthr (d), (e), (f), by AWD (g), (h), (i)

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Figure 10

Demodulation and detection of the frequency of the impulse train by wavelet demodulation for BPFO 8mm2: by MWDmax (a), (b), (c), by MWDthr (d), (e), (f), by AWD (g), (h), (i)

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Figure 11

Demodulation and detection of the frequency of the impulse train by wavelet demodulation for BPFI 20mm2: by MWDmax (a), (b), (c), by MWDthr (d), (e), (f), by AWD (g), (h), (i)

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Figure 12

Disturbed signals: (a) BPFO 20mm2; (b) BPFO 14mm2; (c) BPFO 8mm2; and (d) BPFI 20mm2

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Figure 13

Determination of parameters α for disturbed signals

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Figure 14

Demodulation and detection of the frequency of the impulse train by wavelet demodulation for BPFO 20mm2: by MWDmax (a), (b), (c), by MWDthr (d), (e), (f), by AWD (g), (h), (i)

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Figure 15

Demodulation and detection of the frequency of the impulse train by wavelet demodulation for BPFO 14mm2: by MWDmax (a), (b), (c), by MWDthr (d), (e), (f), by AWD (g), (h), (i)

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Figure 16

Demodulation and detection of the frequency of the impulse train by wavelet demodulation for BPFO 8mm2: by MWDmax (a), (b), (c), by MWDthr (d), (e), (f), by AWD (g), (h), (i)

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Figure 17

Demodulation and detection of the frequency of the impulse train by wavelet demodulation for BPFI 20mm2: by MWDmax (a), (b), (c), by MWDthr (d), (e), (f), by AWD (g), (h), (i)

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Figure 18

Characteristics of the bearing

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