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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Active Vibration Damping Using an Inertial, Electrodynamic Actuator (DETC2005-84632)

[+] Author and Article Information
Christoph Paulitsch

 Kaiserallee 21, 76133 Karlsruhe, Germanycpaulits@gmx.de

Paolo Gardonio, Stephen J. Elliott

Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK

J. Vib. Acoust 129(1), 39-47 (Jul 16, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2349537 History: Received October 07, 2005; Revised July 16, 2006

Active vibration damping using a shunted inertial actuator is advantageous if external sensors cannot be collocated with the actuators, or these sensors would add too much weight or cost. When electrodynamic actuators are used, damping can be directly added to the structure where they are attached without the need of electronic integrators or differentiators. Inertial actuators have also the advantage that they do not need to react relative to a fixed base. In this paper, control with a shunted resistor, current feedback, and induced voltage feedback, with and without inductance compensation, are all investigated in simulations and experiments. Experiments with a lightweight, inertial actuator on a clamped plate show that vibration amplitude is decreased between 6 and 13dB and control bandwidth is doubled when the internal actuator inductance is compensated.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Sketch of the model problem

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Figure 2

Photo and cross section sketch of coil former (1), moving mass (2), and spring (3)

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Figure 3

Model of the electrodynamic, inertial actuator connected to the plate and reacting against a moving mass

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Figure 4

Control schemes where the following four circuits are added to the actuator: (a) shunted resistor; (b) a positive current feedback loop; (c) an induced voltage feedback loop; and (d) an induced voltage feedback loop with inductance compensation

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Figure 5

General feedback control framework

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Figure 6

Photograph of the experimental setup with the primary shaker below the plate in the background and the inertial control actuator above the plate in the foreground

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Figure 7

Nyquist plot of the simulated (left) and measured (right) open loop FRF Goi between the voltage input UAB to the actuator and the coil current I

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Figure 8

Amplitude of the simulated (left) and measured (right) FRF Gsp−GsihGop∕(1+hGoi) between the disturbance force Fp and the plate velocity Vs at the control position in the open loop case without actuator (thick dashed line), with actuator (thick solid line) and for a 1Ω shunted resistor (thin solid line)

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Figure 9

Nyquist plot of the simulated (left) and measured (right) open loop FRF Goi between the input voltage UAC and the feedback voltage UBC

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Figure 10

Amplitude of the simulated (left) and measured (right) FRF Gsp−GsihGop∕(1+hGoi) between the primary disturbance force Fp and the plate velocity at the secondary actuator position Vs in the open loop case (thick solid line) and for positive current feedback (thin solid line and thick dashed line)

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Figure 11

Nyquist plot of the simulated (left) and measured (right) open loop FRF Goi between the bridge input voltage UBC and the bridge output voltage UAD

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Figure 12

Amplitude of the simulated (left) and measured (right) FRF Gsp−GsihGop∕(1+hGoi) between the primary disturbance force Fp and the plate velocity at the secondary actuator position Vs in the open loop case (thick solid line) and for increasing bridge output voltage feedback gains (thin solid and thick dashed line)

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Figure 13

Nyquist plot of the simulated (left) and measured (right) open loop FRF Goi between the Owens bridge input UBC and output voltage UAD

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Figure 14

Amplitude of the simulated (left) and measured (right) FRF Gsp−GsihGop∕(1+hGoi) between the primary disturbance force Fp and the plate velocity at the secondary actuator position Vs in the open loop case (thick solid line) and for increasing Owens bridge output voltage feedback gains (thin solid and thick dashed line)

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