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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Effects of Frictional Models on the Dynamic Response of the Impact Drive Mechanism

[+] Author and Article Information
Jih-Lian Ha

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Far East College, 49 Chung-Hua Road, Shin-Shi, Tainan, Taiwan 744, ROC

Rong-Fong Fung1

Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, 1 University Road, Yenchau, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 824, ROCrffung@ccms.nkfust.edu.tw

Chang-Fu Han

Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, 1 University Road, Yenchau, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 824, ROC

Jer-Rong Chang

Department of Aircraft Engineering, Air Force Institute of Technology, 1 Jyulun Road, Gang-Shan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 820, ROC

1

Corresponding author.

J. Vib. Acoust 128(1), 88-96 (Apr 12, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2128641 History: Received February 02, 2004; Revised April 12, 2005

This paper first introduces the effects of various frictional models on the dynamic behaviors of a simple mechanical system with frictional forces, which are described by the Leuven model combined with the Bouc-Wen model of the hysteresis. The frictional model allows accurate dynamic modeling both in the sliding and the presliding regimes without using switching functions. Secondly, these analytic results are applied to the precise positioning impact drive mechanism (IDM) and make the frictional actions more accurate. The hysteresis effect is also considered in the piezoelectric force of the IDM. It is shown that the hysteresis frictional force has critical influence on the final position of the micro- and nanometer positioning.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 8

The free-body diagram for the theoretical modeling

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Figure 7

Principle of the forward motion of the IDM

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Figure 6

Contribution of each term in the Leuven model’s polynomial for the case of A=0.2

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Figure 5

Dynamic behavior in the presliding regime. (a) The frictional force Ff vs the velocity v. (b) The frictional force Ff vs the displacement x. (c) The hysteresis frictional force Fh vs the state variable z.

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Figure 4

Dynamic behavior of a simple system in the sliding regime with three impulse forces. (a) The three impulse forces. (b) The frictional force Ff vs the velocity v. (c) The frictional force Ff vs the displacement x. (x) The hysteresis frictional force Fh vs the state variable z.

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Figure 3

The hysteresis curve of the frictional force Ff vs the displacement x in the LuGre model.

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Figure 2

The characteristic frictional force-velocity curve of the LuGre model

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Figure 1

The characteristic frictional force-velocity curve of the Karnopp model

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Figure 9

The triangular single-wave input voltage

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Figure 10

Simulations of a single-wave input. (a) The displacement x1 of main body. (b) The velocity ẋ1 of main body. (c) The displacement x2 of the weight. (d) The velocity ẋ2 of the weight.

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Figure 11

Simulations of the frictional force due to a single-wave input. (a) The hysteresis frictional force Fh vs the state variable z. (b) The frictional force Ff vs the velocity of x1. (c) The transient response. (d) The frictional force Ff vs the displacement of x1 corresponding to (c).

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Figure 12

Simulations of the continuous-wave inputs. (a) The continuous-wave signals. (b) Dynamic responses of the displacement x1.

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Figure 13

Simulations of the forward-backward-wave inputs. (a) The continuous signals. (b) Dynamic responses of the main body due to the input signals (a). (c) The continuous signals without negative voltage. (d) Dynamic responses of the main body due to the input signals (c).

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Figure 14

Considering the hysteresis effect of the piezoelectric elements. (a) The piezoelectric force vs input voltage V(t) due to the single-wave input. (b) Dynamic responses of the displacement x1 due to a single-wave input. (c) Dynamic responses of the displacement x1 due to the continuous-wave inputs.

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