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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Prediction of Railway-Induced Ground Vibrations in Tunnels

[+] Author and Article Information
Carlo G. Lai1

 European Centre for Training and Research in Earthquake Engineering (EUCENTRE) c/o Università degli Studi di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, Pavia, 27100, Italycarlo.lai@eucentre.it

Alberto Callerio

 Studio Geotecnico Italiano SrL, Via Ripamonti 89, Milano, 20139, Italysgi_callerio@studio-geotecnico.it

Ezio Faccioli

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Strutturale,  Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milano, 20133, Italyfaccioli@stru.polimi.it

Vittorio Morelli

 Italferr SpA,Via Marsala 53, Roma, 00185, Italyv.morelli@mail.italferr.it

Pietro Romani

 Italferr SpA,Via Marsala 53, Roma, 00185, Italyp.romani@mail.italferr.it

1

Corresponding author. Formerly at Studio Geotecnico Italiano SrL, Via Ripamonti 89, Milano, 20139 Italy.

J. Vib. Acoust 127(5), 503-514 (Jan 06, 2005) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2013300 History: Received October 11, 2003; Revised January 06, 2005

The authors of this paper present the results of a study concerned with the assessment of the vibrational impact induced by the passage of commuter trains running in a tunnel placed underground the city of Rome. Since the railway line is not yet operational, it was not possible to make a direct measurement of the ground vibrations induced by the railway traffic and the only way to make predictions was by means of numerical simulations. The numerical model developed for the analyses was calibrated using the results of a vibration measurement campaign purposely performed at the site using as a vibration source a sinusoidal vibration exciter operating in a frequency-controlled mode. The problem of modeling the vibrational impact induced by the passage of a train moving in a tunnel is rather complex because it requires the solution of a boundary value problem of three-dimensional elastodynamics in a generally heterogeneous, nonsimply connected continuum with a moving source. The subject is further complicated by the difficulties of modeling the source mechanism, which constitutes itself a challenge even in the case of railway lines running at the surface. At last, the assessment of the vibrational impact at a receiver placed inside a building (e.g., a human individual or a sensitive instrument) requires an evaluation of the role played by the structure in modifying the computed free-field ground motion. So far, few attempts have been made to model the whole vibration chain (from the source to the receiver) of railway-induced ground vibrations, with results that have been only moderately successful. The numerical simulations performed in this study were made by using a simplified numerical model aimed to capture the essence of the physical phenomena involved in the above vibration chain including the influence of the structural response as well as the dependence of the predicted vibration spectra on the train speed.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic representation of the vibration-path involved in underground railway systems

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Figure 2

Methodology used for the evaluation of vibrational impact from railway traffic (from 13)

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Figure 3

Dynamic vertical oscillator used to model the multicomponent track system (modified from 12)

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Figure 4

Loading emission spectrum adopted in the numerical model—Vertical pressure at the basement of a standard ballasted track—Train category TAF—Transit velocity: 100 Km/h (from 13,12)

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Figure 5

Loading emission spectrum adopted in the numerical model—Vertical pressure at the basement of a standard ballasted track—Train category freight—Transit velocity: 90 Km/h (from 13,12)

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Figure 6

Computation scheme adopted for determining the free-field response at the receiver (from 13)

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Figure 7

Comparison between experimental and computed transfer functions (from 13)

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Figure 8

Measured transfer functions of ground-foundation coupling effect in building A: Experimental (thin line) and piece-wise straight-line approximation (thick line) (from 13)

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Figure 9

Measured transfer functions of combined effect of the vertical-resisting structure and of diaphragm vibration in building A: Experimental (thin line) and piece-wise straight-line approximation (thick line) (from 13)

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Figure 10

Measured transfer functions of combined effect of ground-foundation coupling, vertical-resisting structure, and diaphragm vibration in building B: Experimental (thin line) and piece-wise straight-line approximation (thick line) (from 13)

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Figure 11

Testing site at the Cassia-Montemario underground railway line in Rome, Italy—Position of seismometers in section A (from 13)

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Figure 12

Testing site at the Cassia-Montemario underground railway line in Rome, Italy—Campbell’s diagrams in Section A—Seismometers S2 and S3 (from 13)

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Figure 13

Results of numerical simulations at the Cassia-Montemario underground railway line in Rome, Italy—Magnitude of acceleration spectrum in one-third octave scale at the center of the second floor of building A—Comparison with standard ISO 2631 for the evaluation of human response to vibrations (from 13)

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Figure 14

Results of numerical simulations at the Cassia-Montemario underground railway line in Rome, Italy—Magnitude of acceleration spectrum in one-third octave scale at the center of the second floor of building B—Comparison with standard ISO 2631 for the evaluation of human response to vibrations (from 13)

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