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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Active Stiffeners for Vibration Control of a Circular Plate Structure: Analytical and Experimental Investigations

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael K. Philen1

Structural Dynamics and Controls Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

K. W. Wang2

Structural Dynamics and Controls Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

1

Eastman Kodak Fellow, 157 Hammond Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, Ph# 814-863-1986, mphilen@psu.edu

2

William E. Diefenderfer, Chaired Professor in Mechanical Engineering, 157E Hammond Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, kwwang@psu.edu

J. Vib. Acoust 127(5), 441-450 (Jan 19, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2013303 History: Received August 12, 2003; Revised January 19, 2005

Space-based adaptive optic systems have gained considerable attention within the past couple of decades. Achieving the increasingly stringent performance requirements for these systems is greatly hindered by strict weight restrictions, size limitations, and subjected hostile environments. There has been considerable attention in developing lightweight adaptive optics where piezoelectric sheet actuators are attached on the back of optical mirrors to achieve a high precision surface shape with minimum additional weight. Vibration control of such large flexible space structures is continually challenging to engineers due to the large number of actuators and sensors and the large number of vibration modes within the operational bandwidth. For these structures, any disturbed modes are likely to remain vibrating for an extended period of time due to the small amount of damping available. As a result, controller spillover should be minimized as much as possible to avoid exciting the residual modes. In recent investigations of circular plate shape control by [Philen and Wang, Int. Soc. Opt. Eng.4327, pp. 709–719]. It was demonstrated that directional decoupling of the two-dimensional actuator (meaning that the actuation in one of the two directions is eliminated) improves the system performance when correcting for the lower order Zernike static deformations. This directional decoupling effect can be achieved through an active stiffener (AS) design. In this research, analytical and experimental efforts are carried out to examine the effect of the active stiffener actuators in reducing the controller spillover through the stiffeners’ decoupling characteristics. It is shown that significant reductions in controller spillover can be achieved in systems using the active stiffener actuators when compared to systems having direct attached (DA) actuators, thus resulting in improved vibration control performance. The experimental results verify the analytical predictions and clearly demonstrate the merit of the active stiffener concept.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Illustration of active stiffener

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Figure 2

Finite element model of AS system

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Figure 3

Dimension definitions of active stiffener

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Figure 4

Maximum spillover energy (top) and maximum voltage (bottom) for DA and AS (Uinitialsys=0.1J)

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Figure 5

Controller spillover energy—first (top) and eighth (bottom) mode controlled (Uinitialsys=0.1J)

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Figure 6

Controller spillover energy (top) and maximum voltage (bottom)—second mode controlled (Uinitialhost=0.1J)

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Figure 7

Adaptive plates with direct attached and active stiffener actuators

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Figure 8

Configuration of experimental setup

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Figure 9

Modal analysis points for both adaptive plates

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Figure 10

Frequency response for AS and DA (measurement point 3, excited by actuator PZT 1)

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Figure 11

Eigenvalue shifting for AS and DA—measurement point 3—controlling third mode (ωnobs=300Hz,ξobs=0.5)

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Figure 12

Stability region for AS and DA—measurement point 3—controlling first mode

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Figure 13

Stability region for AS and DA—measurement point 3—controlling third mode

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Figure 14

Average power spectrum for controlled and uncontrolled modes—first mode controlled

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Figure 15

Average power spectrum for controlled and uncontrolled modes—third mode controlled

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