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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Hybrid Active Noise Control of a One-Dimensional Acoustic Duct

[+] Author and Article Information
E. Esmailzadeh

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P6

A. Alasty, A. R. Ohadi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran

J. Vib. Acoust 124(1), 10-18 (Apr 01, 2001) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1400117 History: Received September 01, 2000; Revised April 01, 2001
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Schematic diagram of finite length duct
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Feedforward ANC systems with acoustic feedback neutralization
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Hybrid ANC systems using the FIR feedforward ANC system
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Boundary condition effect; duct system frequency response at point xe=16/17. Source position: xp=1/17;γ1(s)=0.8 (solid), γ1(s)=0.0(--—),γ1(s)=−0.8([[dashed_line]]).
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Boundary condition effect; maximum steady state pressure distribution along the length of the duct, excitation frequency=80 Hz. (solid) ‘○’: γ1=0.8; ‘*’:γ1=0.6; ‘+’: γ1=0.4; ‘×’: γ1=0.2; ‘•’: γ1=0.0; (-----) ‘○’: γ1=−0.8; ‘*’:γ1=−0.6; ‘+’: γ1=−0.4; ‘×’: γ1=−0.2.
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Source location effect; maximum steady state pressure distribution along the length of the duct, excitation frequency=80 Hz,γ0(s)=−1,γ1(s)=0.6
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Transmission zeros; frequency response of the duct system at point xe=16/17. Source position: xp=15/17;γ0(s)=−1.0,γ1(s)=0.6.
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(Example #1) Sound pressure versus time at point xe=16/17 (a) without ANC system (b) feedforward ANC with feedback neutralization (c) hybrid ANC system with FIR feedforward and feedback neutralization
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(Example #2) Sound pressure spectra at point xe=16/17 (One) γ01=−1.0 (Two) γ0=−1.0,γ1=0.6 Solid: without ANC system (-.): feedforward FXLMS ANC (--): feedforward G-FXLMS ANC (..): hybrid ANC with feedback neutralization

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