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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Noise Reduction Using Finite-Length Flexible Segments

[+] Author and Article Information
Brian Chapnik

HGC Engineering, 2000 Argentia Road, Plaza One, Suite 203, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5N 1P7

I. G. Currie

Department of Mechanical, and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G8

J. Vib. Acoust 122(2), 94-108 (Oct 01, 1999) (15 pages) doi:10.1115/1.568446 History: Received April 01, 1999; Revised October 01, 1999
Copyright © 2000 by ASME
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References

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Chapnik, B. V., and Currie, I. G., 1996, “Computation and Verification of the Effects of Finite Length Flexible Segments on Acoustic Wave Propagation in One-Dimensional Systems,” Proceedings of the 1996 ASME Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting, Computational Aeroacoustics Forum, FED-238, San Diego, CA, pp. 497–502.
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Figures

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Conceptual representation of system under study
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Termination impedance (normalized), short open end (dotted line—upstream sensors, dashed line—downstream sensors, solid line—theory)
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Termination impedance (normalized), long open end (dotted line—upstream sensors, dashed line—downstream sensors, solid line—theory)
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Termination impedance (normalized), “anechoic” end (dotted line—upstream sensors, dashed line—downstream sensors, solid line—theory)
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Sound pressure level at coupling, “anechoic” termination (dotted line—upstream sensors, dashed line—downstream sensors, solid line—microphone probe)
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Calculated versus measured insertion loss, hose 1. Top—short open end; middle—long open end; bottom— “anechoic” end (solid line—calculated, dotted line—measured).
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Calculated versus measured insertion loss, hose 2. Top—short open end; middle—long open end; bottom— “anechoic” end (solid line—calculated, dotted line—measured).
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Calculated versus measured insertion loss, hose 3. Top—short open end; middle—long open end; bottom— “anechoic” end (solid line—calculated, dotted line—measured).
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Calculated versus measured insertion loss, hose 4. Top—short open end; middle—long open end; bottom— “anechoic” end (solid line—calculated, dotted line—measured).
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Calculated versus measured insertion loss, hose 5. Top—short open end; middle—long open end; bottom—“anechoic” end (solid line—calculated, dotted line—measured).
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Downstream sensor of downstream pair, short open end (dotted line—loudspeaker excitation, dashed line—ambient)
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Calculated pressure and radial shell modes, hose 1, short open end. Top—near 500 Hz, associated with positive IL; bottom—near 660 Hz, associated with negative IL.
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Calculated versus measured insertion loss, hose 1. Top—nominal value of Young’s modulus; bottom—half of nominal value of Young’s modulus (solid line—calculated, dotted line—measured).
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Calculated insertion loss, wafer versus air, hose 1. Top—short open end; middle—long open end; bottom—“anechoic” end (solid line—water, dotted line—air).

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