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RESEARCH PAPERS

Simple Modeling and Analysis for Crankshaft Three-Dimensional Vibrations, Part 2: Application to an Operating Engine Crankshaft

[+] Author and Article Information
T. Morita, H. Okamura

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo, Japan

J. Vib. Acoust 117(1), 80-86 (Jan 01, 1995) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2873870 History: Received January 01, 1993; Revised September 01, 1993; Online February 26, 2008

Abstract

The modeling and analysis procedures with the dynamic stiffness matrix method described in Part 1 were applied to a crankshaft system, consisting of crankshaft, front pulley, flywheel, piston, and connecting rod, under firing conditions. For firing conditions, (7) one half of the reciprocating masses consisting of the piston, piston pin, and connecting rod small end, and (2) rotating masses of the connecting rod big end mass, were attached to the two ends of the crankpin, taking account of the rigidity of the connecting rod. The excitation forces were calculated from the gas force and the inertia force due to the reciprocating masses. By solving the equations of motion derived in the form of the dynamic stiffness matrix, we calculated the three-dimensional steady-state vibrations of the crankshaft system under firing conditions. A crankshaft system for a four-cylinder in-line automobile engine was used for the analysis. We calculated the influence of the mass and moments of inertia of the front pulley on the behavior of the crankshaft vibrations and the excitation induced at the crankjournal bearings. Calculated values were compared with experimental results.

Copyright © 1995 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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