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Research Papers

Determination of the Vertical Vibration of a Ballasted Railway Track to Be Used in the Experimental Detection of Wheel Flats in Metropolitan Railways

[+] Author and Article Information
Ricard Sanchís

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya,
Avda. Diagonal n. 647,
Barcelona 08028, Spain
e-mail: ricard.sanchis@upc.edu

Salvador Cardona

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya,
Avda. Diagonal n. 647,
Barcelona 08028, Spain
e-mail: salvador.cardona@upc.edu

Jordi Martínez

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya,
Avda. Diagonal n. 647,
Barcelona 08028, Spain
e-mail: jmartinez.miralles@upc.edu

1Deceased.

2Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF VIBRATION AND ACOUSTICS. Manuscript received March 12, 2018; final manuscript received October 25, 2018; published online December 6, 2018. Assoc. Editor: A. Srikantha Phani.

J. Vib. Acoust 141(2), 021015 (Dec 06, 2018) (16 pages) Paper No: VIB-18-1106; doi: 10.1115/1.4041896 History: Received March 12, 2018; Revised October 25, 2018

This paper presents a mathematical model used to obtain the vertical vibration of a ballasted railway track when a wheel is passing at a certain speed over a fixed location of the rail. The aim of this simulation is to compare calculated root-mean-square (RMS) values of the vertical vibration velocity with measured RMS values. This comparison is the basis for a proposed time domain methodology for detecting potential wheel flats or any other singular defect on the wheel rolling bands of metropolitan trains. In order to reach this goal, a wheel–rail contact model is proposed; this model is described by the track vertical impulse response and the vertical impulse response of the wheel with the primary suspension, both linked through a Hertz nonlinear stiffness. To solve the model for obtaining the wheel–rail contact force, a double convolution method is applied. Several kinds of wheel flats are analyzed, from theoretical round edged wheel flats to different real wheel profile irregularities. Afterward, the vertical vibration velocity at a fixed point on the rail is obtained using a variable kernel convolution method. Running different simulations for different wheel flats, a study of the vertical vibration attenuation along the rail is carried out. Finally, it is proceeded to obtain the temporary evolution of the RMS value for the rail vertical vibration velocity in order to be used as a reference for detecting wheel flats or any other defect. This last aspect will be presented in more detail in a second paper.

Copyright © 2019 by ASME
Topics: Vibration , Rails , Wheels
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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Coordinates system used and wheel–rail deformation

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Fig. 2

Parameters distributed model of a ballasted track

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Fig. 3

Ballasted track impulse response

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Fig. 4

Ballasted track impulse response associated with a moving unit impulse of vertical force at 50 ms−1

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Fig. 5

Wheel and primary suspension system model

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Fig. 6

Profile irregularity of the selected wheel perimeter

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Fig. 7

Wavelength spectrum of the roughness amplitude according to Ref. [26]

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Fig. 8

Real wheel roughness profile synthesized from the wavelength spectrum in Fig. 7

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Fig. 9

Wheel–rail contact force fluctuation produced by round-edged wheel flats of 50 μm depth (left) and 200 μm depth (right). Train speed: 12.5 ms−1.

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Fig. 10

Real wheel profile irregularity (up) and the corresponding wheel–rail contact force (down)

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Fig. 11

Synthesized wheel roughness (up) and the corresponding wheel–rail contact force (down)

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Fig. 12

Rail vertical velocity at the considered fixed point produced by the force fluctuation due to a wheel flat of 200 μm depth

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Fig. 13

Profile irregularity of a real wheel measured experimentally and extended during six wheel turns (up) and wheel–rail contact force produced by this profile irregularity (down)

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Fig. 14

Rail vertical velocity at the considered fixed point produced by the force fluctuation in Fig. 13

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Fig. 15

RMS value corresponding to the rail vertical vibration velocity presented in Fig. 14

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Fig. 16

Synthesized wheel profile irregularity (up) and the corresponding wheel–rail contact force. Simulation for six wheel turns.

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Fig. 18

RMS value corresponding to the rail vertical vibration velocity presented in Fig. 17

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Fig. 19

Measured vertical vibration velocity of the rail produced by a train passing at 45 kmh−1. Part including the pass of a bogie over the accelerometer location (triangular signals).

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Fig. 20

RMS value corresponding to the measured rail vertical vibration velocity presented in Fig. 19

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Fig. 21

Average, maximum, and minimum RMS time evolutions of 30 simulated roughness profiles obtained as explained in Sec. 5

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Fig. 22

Unitary rail vertical vibration velocity attenuation depending on the distance from the wheel–rail contact location to the fixed point. Adjustment of the average RMS values of different simulations, using different theoretical wheel flats with different depths.

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Fig. 23

Unitary rail vertical vibration velocity attenuation depending on the distance from the wheel–rail contact location to the fixed point. Adjustment of the average RMS values of different simulations, using different real wheel flats obtained from four different wheels.

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Fig. 24

Unitary rail vertical vibration velocity attenuation of several train wheels depending on the distance from the wheel–rail contact location to the fixed point. Adjustment of the average RMS values.

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Fig. 17

Rail vertical velocity coming from the simulation of the prior synthesized real wheel profile (Fig. 16)

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